Sunday 10th December

Mickey Ned O’Sullivan – Kenmare, Kerry.

Click photo to enlarge – 

 

People of the Wild Atlantic Way Photography Project – 

 

Mickey Ned O’Sullivan – Kenmare, Kerry.

 

‘One can achieve anything as long as one is not concerned about who gets the credit.’

 

Share:   Facebook   Twitter   Email

Comments

Tuesday 5th December

Edel Crowley – Kenmare, Kerry.

Click photo to enlarge – 

 

People of the Wild Atlantic Way Photography Project – 

 

Edel Crowley – Kenmare, Kerry.

 

My favourite  memory from childhood …. spending Christmas night at my grandmothers bar (Crowley’s Bar, Henry Street, Kenmare).

 

The whole family would gather (we have a very large family). Aunts, uncles, cousins, we would spend the evening drinking as much minerals and eating as many packets of Tayto as we possibly could until we felt sick! and discussing what Santa had brought us! It was so much fun!

 

My grandmother, Joan Crowley passed away earlier this year and the bar is now run by my uncle Peter.

She would have loved this project as she was a great people person and was known near and far, a legend in her own right … a great musician, she was loved by everyone who knew her and is missed dearly …

It just goes to show the importance of recording things and writing down memories and taking pictures to ensure precious memories are passed on.’

 

Share:   Facebook   Twitter   Email

Comments

Sunday 3rd December

John O’Sullivan – Kenmare, Kerry.

Click photo to enlarge – 

 

People of the Wild Atlantic Way Photography Project – 

 

John O’Sullivan – Kenmare, Kerry.

 

‘My favourite song is – My Heart and I. The reason is, I always sing it in a duet with my wife Eileen on social occasions. I have many happy memories of it’.

 

Share:   Facebook   Twitter   Email

Comments

Wednesday 22nd November

Jason Lee – Ballydehob, West Cork.

Click photo to enlarge – 

 

People of the Wild Atlantic Way Photography Project -

 

Jason Lee – Ballydehob, West Cork.

 

Here’s a favourite poem of mine by Charles Baudelaire – 

 

Be Drunk

Always be drunk.

Nothing else matters: its the only way.

So as not to feel the horrible burden of time that

Breaks your back and bends you to the earth, you

You have to be continually drunk.

 

Drunk on what?

With wine, with poetry, or with virtue, as you will.

But be drunk.

 

As if sometimes,

On the stairs of a palace,

Or on the green side of a ditch,

Or in the dreary solitude of your own room,

Should you awaken and the drunkenness already

Diminished or gone,

 

Ask of the wind, or of the wave, 

Or of the star, or of the bird,

Or of the clock, of whatever flies,

Or sighs, or rocks, or sings, or speaks,

 

Ask what time it is; and the wind, wave, star, bird,

clock will answer you:

‘Its time to be drunk!

On wine, on poetry or on virtue as you wish.’

 

Share:   Facebook   Twitter   Email

Comments

Sunday 19th November

James O’Sullivan – Sheep’s Head, West Cork.

Click photo to enlarge – 

 

People of the Wild Atlantic Way Photography Project – 

 

James O’Sullivan – Sheep’s Head, West Cork.

 

When I was younger I went away to work, thinking every where else was better. I had to go away to appreciate  the place I came from and this appreciation drew me back. This is where I’m happiest, living on the peninsula, experiencing nature in all its majesty, its ever changing moods, big skies, stormy seas. Money can’t buy your invironment. The pace of life, the warmth and kindness of people, a gift that is given freely, it cannot be bought. I may not be rich but I’m happy. Happiness is the main goal in life and that’s what completes me as a person.’

 

Share:   Facebook   Twitter   Email

Comments

Thursday 16th November

Patricia O’Sullivan – Ballydehob, West Cork.

Click photo to enlarge – 

 

People of the Wild Atlantic Way Photography Project – 

 

Patricia O’Sullivan – Ballydehob, West Cork.

 

One of my favourite poems comes from a book called  ‘The Gift’. A collection of poems by Haliz, the great Sufi master from Persia (14th C.)

recently translated by Daniel Ladinsky.

 

With That Moon Language

 

Admit something:

Everyone you see, you say to them,

Love me’

 

Of course you do not do this out loud;

Otherwise,

Someone will call the cops.

 

Still though, think about this, 

The great pull in us 

To connect.

 

Why not become the one 

Who lives with a full moon in each eye

That is always saying, 

 

With that sweet moon language

 

What every other eye in this world

Is dying to hear.

 

I’m glad of this poem, because it reminds me to love, as do all the magnificent people in my life.

Share:   Facebook   Twitter   Email

Comments

Monday 13th November

Andrew Street, Ballydehob, West Cork.

Click photo to enlarge – 

 

People of the Wild Atlantic Way Photography Project – 

 

Andrew Street – Ballydehob, West Cork.

 

‘The albums Hunky Dory & Ziggy Stardust came out when I was 16/17 years old. Hearing them and seeing David Bowie live on that tour made me realise it was a good thing to be an individual (even eccentric). I was able to thank him for changing my life when I met him 2 years later at the Lacarno gig. That is why Life on Mars is so important to me.’

 

Share:   Facebook   Twitter   Email

Comments

Sunday 5th November

Margaret Downey Harrington – Castletownbere, West Cork.

Click photo to enlarge – 

 

People of the Wild Atlantic Way Photography Project – 

 

Margaret Downey Harrington – Castletownbere, West Cork.

 

I’ve been involved in the fishing industry all my life, my father was a fisherman and my grandfather and great grandfather were fishermen. I’ve always had a deep connection with the sea.

A cherished memory from childhood is a practice that fishermen call ‘shading’ and if I close my eyes now I can visualize it as if it were yesterday. A whole lot of things must come together at the right time for it to happen, like getting all the ingredients together to bake a Christmas cake. Firstly, on a low tide, you need a lovely quite, still, peaceful morning, usually in May, with no wind, not even a puff of a baby’s breath,  just stillness. With the particular crystal clear light the water is very clear and you can see right through it, and see the scallops on the sea bed. Fishermen used a tool not unlike a shrimp net to catch them.

 

I can remember times being out in a boat with my father, the stillness and peacefulness was like time standing still, I couldn’t even talk, I had to be perfectly still and not make a sound. The ‘shading’ could last only half an hour, a slight gentle breeze could come up and the moment would be gone. Its so fickle, so delicate, a moment in time when everything aligns. you would only get a handful of those days in a year, it either happens or it doesn’t, that’s it. Once the breeze comes up the moment is gone.

Coming home with a bag of scallops and cooking them in their shell with a knob of butter on an open fire was the perfect way to end the perfect day.’

 

Share:   Facebook   Twitter   Email

Comments

Thursday 2nd November

Ana Barrett – Ballydehob, West Cork.

Click photo to enlarge – 

 

People of the Wild Atlantic Way Photography Project – 

 

Ana Barrett – Ballydehob, West Cork.

 

‘The following is a few lines from one of my favourite songs…..

 

Something good comes with the bad,

A song is never just sad.

There’s hope, there’s a silver lining.’

 

First Aid Kit – My Silver Lining.

 

Share:   Facebook   Twitter   Email

Comments

Sunday 29th October

Teddy Black – Castletownbere, West Cork.

Click photo to enlarge – 

 

People of the Wild Atlantic Way Photography Project – 

 

Teddy Black – Castletownbere, West Cork.

 

The thing I love doing most of all is story telling because its an escape from reality but it is also very entertaining for people. I’ve been telling stories since childhood. My grandmother had a restaurant and boarding house. People from all over Ireland stayed there, including lighthouse keepers and fishermen and it was from listening to their stories that I developed an interest in story telling.

 

Beara has a great tradition of story telling and is a great source for stories. I tell stories about the everyday, funny characters, local history, tragedies at sea and ancient mythology. International visitors are fascinated by Irish mythology, as far back as Cú Chulainn and stories of what Ireland was like in the past and the changes that have happened.

 

Story telling is a way of preserving an oral history, a way of connecting to the past and bringing to life events that would otherwise be forgotten, such as tragic events that took place on the Calf Rock, off Dursey Island in the mid 1800’s when the locals on Dursey thought they saw a distress signal from the Calf Lighthouse during a storm. Seven men set out in an open boat, a huge wave capsized the boat and all seven were drowned.’

Share:   Facebook   Twitter   Email

Comments